Covid-19 Update

March 25, 2020

To our patients,

In keeping with Governor Brown’s Executive Order 20-10, our office will be closed until June 15th, 2020.

We are working this week on getting patient appointments rescheduled.  If you have not already received a call from someone at our office you should receive one shortly.

Both Dr. Jessica and Dr. Stevenson will be available for dental emergencies for any patients that exhibit no signs or symptoms of illness and have not traveled outside of the country in the last 14 days.  

If you are experiencing a dental emergency, please call Dr. Stevenson at 801-885-7639 or Dr. Jessica at 541-232-0398. If you are sent to their voicemail, please leave your name, phone number, and a brief description of your emergency. They will return your call as soon as possible. 

We will continue to monitor the status of COVID-19 nationally and within our community.  Please visit us at smithjacksondental.com for links to the latest updates.  Thank you for your understanding.

We miss seeing each of you and hope you and your family are well in this uncertain time.

Dr Jessica Jackson & Dr Stevenson Smith

3 Ways to Care for Your Mouth When You’re Sick

Smith & Jackson hopes you’re surviving cold and flu season, but if you’re not, here are some simple ways to care for your dental health when you’re not feeling well:

Practice Good Hygiene

According to the CDC, the flu virus can live on moist surfaces for 72 hours. You shouldn’t be sharing your toothbrush in normal circumstances but especially when you are sick. We highly recommend replacing your toothbrush after you’ve been sick even though the chances of reinfecting yourself are very low. Your toothbrush should be replaced every 3-4 months even when you are not sick.

Swish and Spit After Vomiting

One unfortunate side effect of a stomach flu, among other illnesses, is vomiting. You might be tempted to brush your teeth right away, but it is better to wait. When you vomit, stomach acids are coming in contact with your teeth and coating them, if you brush too soon, you’re just rubbing that acid all over the hard outer shell of your teeth.

Instead, swish with water, a diluted mouth rinse or a mixture of water and 1 tsp. baking soda to help wash the acid away. Spit, and brush about 30 minutes later.

Stay Hydrated to Avoid Dry Mouth

When you’re sick, you need plenty of fluids for many reasons. One is to prevent dry mouth. Not only is it uncomfortable—dry mouth can also put you at greater risk for cavities. The medications you might be taking for a cold or flu—such as antihistamines, decongestants or pain relievers—can also dry out your mouth, so drink plenty of water and suck on cough drops, or throat lozenges to keep saliva flowing.

Stay healthy!

What is Orofacial Pain?

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Orofacial pain includes a number of clinical problems involving the chewing (masticatory) muscles or temporomandibular joint. Problems can include temporomandibular joint discomfort; muscle spasms in the head, neck and jaw; migraines, cluster or frequent headaches; or pain with the teeth, face or jaw.

You swallow approximately 2,000 times per day, which causes the upper and lower teeth to come together and push against the skull. People who have an unstable bite, missing teeth or poorly aligned teeth can have trouble because the muscles work harder to bring the teeth together, causing strain. Pain also can be caused by clenching or grinding teeth, trauma to the head and neck or poor ergonomics.

Some people may experience pain in the ears, eyes, sinuses, cheeks or side of the head. Others experience painful clicking when moving the jaw or even locking if the jaw is opened or closed.

If you are experiencing any of these types of pain, Dr Jessica and Dr Stevenson are happy to help.  Please call for an appointment today.

For more information click HERE or HERE.